Why Young Managers Work Better?

Why young managers work better?

Surprising facts about management

A common phrase soon after you graduate from your MBA program and start attending interviews for managerial roles will – “isn’t he too young and lacks experience? Will he/she be able to handle the job?”

This is a common phrase tossed around when the organizations replace their management retirees with the “freshly off boats”. Even young managers who are appointed by firms expressed concerns regarding the attitude of employees who have been working for the firm for years and are at least 20 years older than the new manager. They often show frustration to be working under a manager so much younger and inexperienced than them.

So, is this common fear grounded? Are newly appointed young managers effective enough? Are the older more seasoned managers with a few more shades of grey (if not with an empty field) better than the younger ones?

Older bosses believe that the older more seasoned managerial folks are usually better at their jobs being veterans in this field. But the recent studies show a surprisingly different data. A recent article from Harvard Business Review showed the statistics of managers from 650,000 and paid special attention to lot below the age of 30 years. A comparison of their effectiveness was also launched weighing them to a group of older ones over the age of 45 years and above. Once they were separated into two distinct groups, their characters were put under the scanner.

The rule of thumb employed when comparing two groups is to first put them as similar entities as much as possible. And with these two groups of managers it was fairly easy as most of the candidates were promoted to managerial roles at relatively young age. But one striking observation was that the people in the younger group were potentially higher achievers. Having chosen for such a high responsibility job role at such a young age does not happen often. Out of all the managers the younger lot scored 44 percent higher in the leadership effectiveness quartile and bagged a higher position in the charts. But when compared to those in the older group only 20 percent were able to bag the top positions in the higher quartiles. The older group consisted of a mix of personnel, some of who were exceptional while others were just good but there were also a lot who needed some improvements in their managerial skills.

Looking at the overall data of the comparison between the younger and older groups of managers, the authors of the paper have concluded that the younger managers’ group has been rated higher in all the 49 items in their list of comparing factors. This news might just overthrow the whole existing belief system that wisdom is accompanied with experience. Young blood may just be higher on the efficiency factor and get things done better, than the more seasoned folks who will also need seasoned tastes and desires to be fulfilled.

So, when you are asked the question of whether you think you can fit the managerial role at a young age; try citing these conclusions of research to affirm your cachet for the organization. And while you are still in college, get those assignment scores higher with MBA assignment help from Management Writing Solutions.

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